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deformutilated:

An estimated one in 2 million lobsters are blue. A genetic mutation causes a blue lobster to produce an excessive amount of a particular protein.The protein and a red carotenoid molecule known as astaxanthin combine to form a blue complex known as crustacyanin, giving the lobster its blue color

deformutilated:

An estimated one in 2 million lobsters are blue. A genetic mutation causes a blue lobster to produce an excessive amount of a particular protein.The protein and a red carotenoid molecule known as astaxanthin combine to form a blue complex known as crustacyanin, giving the lobster its blue color

To have another language is to possess a second soul.

Charlemagne.

There are some 7,000 languages spoken in the world, and they exhibit tremendous variance. Lera Boroditsky and her colleagues’ research have shown that language—from verb tenses to gender to metaphors—can shape the most fundamental dimensions of human cognition, including space, time, causality, and our relationships with others.

Can Language Influence Our Perception of Reality?

(via leasline)

post-mitotic:

rat brain: a mosaic of glia and neurons
fluorescence, 600x
credit: Thomas Deerinck

post-mitotic:

rat brain: a mosaic of glia and neurons

fluorescence, 600x

credit: Thomas Deerinck

Artist: Nine Inch Nails
Track Name: "And All That Could Have Been"
Played: 384 times
tedbunny:

Samar Hassan

Chris Hondros was an American Pulitzer Prize-nominated war photographer. In 2005, he traveled to Iraq in order to cover the war. On January 18, 2005, Hondros was in Tal Afar when he witnessed a car that failed to stop at a U.S. checkpoint. U.S. Soldiers feared a suicide bomber and opened fire on the car killing both parents and injuring one of their five children. Hondros approached the scene and captured a picture of 5-year-old Samar Hassan splattered in her parent’s blood. After the photo was published, it quickly caused controversy and was spread across the world. Many feel the picture is the most iconic image of the Iraq War, similar to the naked Vietnamese girl screaming and running after a napalm attack. The Iraq War delivered few singular images, partly because it was too dangerous for photographers. The U.S. military also set strict rules for journalists.
In 2011, Samar Hassan looked at the picture for first time and was interviewed by the New York Times Middle East. About the incident she said that her family was in the car because her brother was sick and that they were returning from the hospital. In 2011, Samar was living on the outskirts of Mosul in a two-story house with four other families, mostly relatives. Chris Hondros was quoted about the once in a lifetime photograph: “Almost every soldier in Iraq has been involved in some sort of incident like that or another, I would say. Their attitude about it was grim, but it wasn’t the end of their world.” It was reported on April 20, 2011, that Chris Hondros and photojournalist Tim Hetherington were killed by a mortar attack in Misrata while covering the 2011 Libyan civil war. (x)

tedbunny:

Samar Hassan

Chris Hondros was an American Pulitzer Prize-nominated war photographer. In 2005, he traveled to Iraq in order to cover the war. On January 18, 2005, Hondros was in Tal Afar when he witnessed a car that failed to stop at a U.S. checkpoint. U.S. Soldiers feared a suicide bomber and opened fire on the car killing both parents and injuring one of their five children. Hondros approached the scene and captured a picture of 5-year-old Samar Hassan splattered in her parent’s blood. After the photo was published, it quickly caused controversy and was spread across the world. Many feel the picture is the most iconic image of the Iraq War, similar to the naked Vietnamese girl screaming and running after a napalm attack. The Iraq War delivered few singular images, partly because it was too dangerous for photographers. The U.S. military also set strict rules for journalists.

In 2011, Samar Hassan looked at the picture for first time and was interviewed by the New York Times Middle East. About the incident she said that her family was in the car because her brother was sick and that they were returning from the hospital. In 2011, Samar was living on the outskirts of Mosul in a two-story house with four other families, mostly relatives. Chris Hondros was quoted about the once in a lifetime photograph: “Almost every soldier in Iraq has been involved in some sort of incident like that or another, I would say. Their attitude about it was grim, but it wasn’t the end of their world.” It was reported on April 20, 2011, that Chris Hondros and photojournalist Tim Hetherington were killed by a mortar attack in Misrata while covering the 2011 Libyan civil war. (x)

cognitivedissonance:

Tonight in Ferguson, Mo. Even CNN is calling out police brutality.

We are watching history unfold. Do not stand down. Spread the word.

No justice, no peace.

xemsiege replied to your post “man I follow way too many blogs now, this is becoming a problem … …”

apparently i follow 94, but it feels way less

loool oh awks, I kinda don’t want to say how many I follow now…

but maybe some of the blogs you’re following are inactive? that’s what’s happened to me with quite a few, but the majority are still active, so it gets kinda overwhelming sometimes.

xhxix:

digital image, 2014

xhxix:

digital image, 2014

We must take sides. Neutrality helps the oppressor, never the victim. Silence encourages the tormentor, never the tormented. Sometimes we must interfere. When human lives are endangered, when human dignity is in jeopardy, national borders and sensitivities become irrelevant. Wherever men and women are persecuted because of their race, religion, or political views, that place must - at that moment - become the center of the universe.

— Elie Wiesel (via missrosemaryclaire)

man I follow way too many blogs now, this is becoming a problem

*follows 20 more blogs*

nubbsgalore:

the world wildlife fund estimates that each year 4.4 million sharks are unintentionally caught as bycatch from unregulated commercial tuna fisheries using long lines and drift nets. a shark caught in a net will suffocate to death. shark numbers have declined by as much as 80 per cent worldwide, with a third of all species now threatened by extinction (pew charitable trusts). photos by (click pic) fiona ayerst, adam baughterry maas and brian skerry

tedbunny:

The Brothers at Nagasaki

The photograph above was taken by US Marines photographer Joe O’Donnell shortly after the bombing of Nagasaki. He saw and smelled things beyond imagining, and the experience left him with depression in his later years. Yet according to O’Donnell’s son, the image above affected him more than any other.
The younger child in the picture is dead. The older boy is his brother, and he’d carried his sibling on his back to a crematory. The older boy stayed and watched his brother burn yet refused to cry. He bit his lip so hard it bled.
The boy had just lost everything to the most destructive force known to mankind. Yet, barefoot, he’d carried his sibling’s body to ensure he was honored properly. It’s a story of the extremes of sadness and bravery—and the photograph captures both. (x)

tedbunny:

The Brothers at Nagasaki

The photograph above was taken by US Marines photographer Joe O’Donnell shortly after the bombing of Nagasaki. He saw and smelled things beyond imagining, and the experience left him with depression in his later years. Yet according to O’Donnell’s son, the image above affected him more than any other.

The younger child in the picture is dead. The older boy is his brother, and he’d carried his sibling on his back to a crematory. The older boy stayed and watched his brother burn yet refused to cry. He bit his lip so hard it bled.

The boy had just lost everything to the most destructive force known to mankind. Yet, barefoot, he’d carried his sibling’s body to ensure he was honored properly. It’s a story of the extremes of sadness and bravery—and the photograph captures both. (x)

s-c-i-guy:

Hair cells: the sound-sensing cells in the ear
These cells get their name from the hairlike structures that extend from them into the fluid-filled tube of the inner ear. When sound reaches the ear, the hairs bend and the cells convert this movement into signals that are relayed to the brain. When we pump up the music in our cars or join tens of thousands of cheering fans at a football stadium, the noise can make the hairs bend so far that they actually break, resulting in long-term hearing loss. 
Image courtesy of Henning Horn, Brian Burke and Colin Stewart, Institute of Medical Biology, Agency for Science, Technology, and Research, Singapore. 
source

s-c-i-guy:

Hair cells: the sound-sensing cells in the ear

These cells get their name from the hairlike structures that extend from them into the fluid-filled tube of the inner ear. When sound reaches the ear, the hairs bend and the cells convert this movement into signals that are relayed to the brain. When we pump up the music in our cars or join tens of thousands of cheering fans at a football stadium, the noise can make the hairs bend so far that they actually break, resulting in long-term hearing loss.

Image courtesy of Henning Horn, Brian Burke and Colin Stewart, Institute of Medical Biology, Agency for Science, Technology, and Research, Singapore.

source

Missouri governor lifts Ferguson curfew as National Guard called in

justiceandcriminology: